MARCHING TO SELMA: HOW MLK, LBJ, & THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT CHANGED THE WORLD

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Fifty years ago in March 1965, the nation watched as Alabama state troopers brutally beat civil rights marchers on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma in what became known as “Bloody Sunday.” Two weeks later the same marchers walked 54 miles to the Alabama capitol in Montgomery, and five months later Congress passed and President Lyndon Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act — one of the most important pieces of legislation in the history of American democracy. This lecture series examines how four crucial roads in the civil rights movement converged in Selma: (a) Mississippi and its fearless civil rights footsoldiers, (b) Nashville and its nonviolent students, (c) Birmingham and its children, and (d) the Texas Hill Country and the first Southern President in a century. Fifty years later, the battle for voting rights for all Americans has returned to the center of the nation’s democracy.

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LECTURE SPEAKER: University of Washington Professor David Domke

DATES: January 5, January 19 (MLK Day), February 2, February 16 (Presidents Day), February 23
TIMES:
7 p.m. for all dates
LOCATION: Kane Hall 120
COST: $150 for series
REGISTRATION: Online at uwdomkelecture2015.bpt.me, or call Jessica Herzog at 206-543-2660