Spring Colloquia: Jason Yip, PhD and Laura Pina, PhD

April 26, 2017 | 3:30 – 5:00 PM | CMU 126

KidsTeam UW: Why do equal partnerships in co-design matter for children and family technologies?

SYNOPSIS: KidsTeam UW is an intergenerational group of children (ages 7 – 11) and adults focused on co-designing new technologies FOR children, WITH children. The goal is to support equal partnerships in co-design with children and adults. But what is an equal partnership? In this talk, Dr. Yip will outline what an equal partnership is composed of and why it matters for technology design, particularly for designing technologies for family interactions. He will also provide examples of his design research at UW, including work supporting families and co-design, designing new programming tools for family engagement, and understanding health technologies with families (in conjunction with Dr. Laura Pina’s work).

Jason Yip is an assistant professor at the Information School (iSchool) and adjunct assistant professor in Human Centered Design & Engineering in University of Washington. His research examines how technologies can support parents and children learning together. He can be reached at jcyip@uw.edu.

From self-tracking technologies to family-centered tracking technologies. Designing technologies to support family health

SYNOPSIS:  “From self-tracking technologies to family-centered tracking technologies. Designing technologies to support family health.” Self-management and self-tracking helps people understand their health, maintain wellbeing, manage a chronic condition, or engage in sense-making to change habits and improve overall health. However, it is still widely regarded as an individual practice. In this talk, Dr. Pina will provide an overview of the work of designing technology for family health that views tracking as a collaborative process between parents and children.

Laura Pina is a Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of Washington with a joint appointment in Computer Science & Engineering (CSE) and Human Centered Design & Engineering (HCDE).  Her research focuses on designing and building technologies in the space of health and wellness, in part through a focus on shifting the lens from personal, self-tracking technologies to consider families as a unit of design.