Ph.D., English Language and Literature, University of Michigan
B.A., English, UC Berkeley

Office: CMU 225
E-Mail: nishime@uw.edu

LeiLani Nishime is an Associate Professor of Communication. Her research areas are multiracial and interracial studies, the intersection of race and gender, Asian American media representations, and Asian American subcultural production. Her book Undercover Asian: Multiracial Asian Americans in Visual Culture (UIP, 2014) looks at the visual representation of multiracial people in mass media. She has co-edited two books on Asian American popular culture and is working on an edited collection on race and ecology. Her most recent articles analyze Hawaiian Sign Language, race in science fiction, and fashion

Dr. Nishime currently serves as the Northwest and Hawai’i representative on the board of the Association of Asian American Studies. She is also one of the organizing members of the Seattle Asian American Film Festival.

Dr. Nishime received her Ph.D. in English Language and Literature from the University of Michigan and her B.A. in English from UC Berkeley. She comes to the UW from Sonoma State University where she was an Associate Professor in American Multicultural Studies.


Selected Publications

Global Asian American Popular Culture, co-editor with Shilpa Davè and Tasha Oren, New York University Press, 2016.

Undercover Asian: Multiracial Asian Americans in Visual Culture, University of Illinois Press, 2014.

Containment as Neocolonial Visual Rhetoric: Fashion, Yellowface, and Karl Lagerfeld’s ‘Idea of China,’ with Anjali Vats, Quarterly Journal of Speech, 99:4, (2013), pp. 423-447.

The Case for Cablinasian: Multiracial Naming from Plessy to Tiger Woods,” Communication Theory, 22:1, (February 2012), pp 92-111.

Aliens: Narrating U.S. Global Identity Through Transnational Adoption and Interracial Marriage in Battlestar Galactica,” Critical Studies in Media Communication, 28:5 (December 2011), pp 450-465.

“The Matrix Trilogy, Keanu Reeves, and Multiraciality at the End of Time” in Mixed Race in Hollywood, Eds. Camilla Fojas and Mary Beltrán, New York University Press, 2008.

East Main Street: Asian American Popular Culture, Co-editor with Shilpa Davé and Tasha Oren, New York University Press, 2005.

“White Skin, White Masks: Vietnam War Films and the Racialized Gaze” in American Visual Cultures, Ed. David Holloway, Continuum Press, 2005, pp 257-264.

The Mulatto Cyborg,” Cinema Journal, 44:2 (Winter 2005), pp 34-49.

Communities on Display: Museums and the Creation of the (Asian) American Citizen,” Amerasia, 30:3 (Winter 2004), pp 40-60.

“’I’m Blackanese’: Pushing the Limits of Cross-Racial Identification in Rush Hour,” in Asian North American Subjectivities, Ed. Eleanor Ty and Donald Goellnicht, University of Indiana Press, 2004, 43-60.

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